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A Real Dream Home from an old sub-urban house

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An old terrace house transformed into an eco-friendly, comfortable living space fora family of four.

Every family dreams of having that perfect home. So did David Chan, one of the leading architects at Design Collective Architects. From a family of three who have enjoyed the exquisite living in a one-and-a-half-bedroom loft, David decided it was time for a bigger space when he and his wife welcomed their second child. And quietly nestled in the suburbs of Subang Jaya, you will find his manifestation of the perfect home for his family – the dDay Haus.

David remarkably transformed the old terrace house into an urban and yet cosy space for the family by preserving its predominantly features – the penetration of natural light and cooling surrounding. To ensure maximum daylight as well as space, glass doors and open ceiling are incorporated into the setting, creating a brightly-lit, open-plan living. The terrace radiantly glows with ample of sunlight beaming in that there is no need to switch on the lights during the daytime. “So, basically we wanted to have all the things that will fit a regular family. At the same time, it has the quality what a bungalow normally has which is very good lighting [in a] good
volume,” David explains.

David grabbed every opportunity to make the most of dDay Haus’s spatial element and turned it into a highly interactive space that spurs various activities for the family. The ground floor constitutes rooms like the living room, dining room and study room where everyone gathers together for daily activities. The first floor is dedicated to the children where their bedroom and playroom are at. As for the adults, the mezzanine floor connected by the staircase with the adult bedroom on the top, this gives them their fair share of privacy. What David has strikingly achieved is balancing both public and private spaces in which everyone can enjoy the solitude without neglecting the importance of family bonding.

He also took the measure to promote airflow by creating what he calls “breathing room”, a silver-railed pent on the upper floor which allows the cool air to rise from the ground to the upper floor. During the night, the refreshing, cool air lingers as the windows and doors are opened along with the “breathing room” attribute. The fact that it is cooling without the artificial air-conditioning, his two sons are able to sleep comfortably as David sees this as a way of healthy living. He reveals that allowing the diffusion of natural lighting and breeze has kept his electricity bill at a surprisingly low rate which does not exceed RM120 monthly.



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